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10 Hottest Tech Skills for 2017

10 hottest tech skills for 2017. Are your assets bankable in 2017?

Hiring managers say they'll seek out these skills most in the New Year.

Please visit http://www.computerworld.com/article/3147427/it-skills-training/10-hottest-tech-skills-for-2017.html for the full article by Mary K Pratt. Computerworld

Mobile applications and device management

21% of respondents with hiring plans said they will be seeking people with this skill in the next 12 months.

Several years into the mobile revolution, mobile initiatives are still top of mind for IT leaders and their companies: Expertise in mobile apps and mobile device management are still among the 10 most sought-after IT skills, and 35% of the respondents to Computerworld's Forecast survey said they plan to increase spending on mobile applications in 2017, making mobile the No. 2 spending priority for the year.

[ Free download: Tech Forecast 2017 -- Complete survey results ]

Reltio, a data management firm in Redwood Shores, Calif., doesn't deploy its own mobile apps, yet managers still need staffers who understand mobile, says Ramon Chen, who oversees personnel and recruiting as chief marketing officer and head of product management.

"We want our existing platform and applications to deploy in a browser-responsive manner, meaning the same code knows when it's running on mobile and that it should display in a mobile-friendly way," he says. And for that to happen, he needs IT employees with mobile app development know-how.

Reltio currently doesn't have mobile-only job titles. Instead, it expects all of its developers to have mobile skills as part of their repertoires. Chen is, however, currently seeking two specialists -- a user interface (UI) designer and a senior UI designer -- to help the company carry out its strategy of delivering on mobile and, more specifically, to help create the best user interfaces and user experiences.

"We want someone who doesn't just design [the mobile app] but also manages it once it's built and in use," he says. "These people need to be customer-facing, too, to be able to get feedback about what [users] like and don't like."

Chen's approach to hiring for these positions, and for mobile skills overall, mirrors the strategies of other IT leaders. He says he wants candidates with the required skills, but he also wants people who fit culturally. Yes, he concedes, it's tough to land people like that in a job market where competition for mobile talent is fierce. But he's willing to take upwards of three months to find the right individuals.